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February 26, 2007
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Children of Lir by TalyrasMirror Children of Lir by TalyrasMirror
The the Celtic King Lir was blessed with a beautiful wife. She bore him four children, a daughter and three sons. But then the good king's queen took ill and died. King Lir remarried, as was the custom. In time, his new wife grew jealous of the children, who were loved by their countrymen and admired for their sweet singing voices. She became so angered that she cursed them. For 200 years they lived as swans, singing in the river by their home. For 600 more years, the were forced to live in ever worse conditions, untill they were ultimately freed of the curse, and regained their human bodies. Then they were old. They were baptised Christian and died.

Celtic myths are not often happy. But they are passionate, as are the people who wrote them.

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I have problems choosing categories for Deviations.

This is an original drawing, and an original pattern, and the first stitiching ever of this pattern. It is blackwork, a method of drawing with thread. But it doesn't quite fit into DA's lists. Artisan crafts are most often thought of as artisan renderings of other people's designs. Hmmm.

Anyway, I will shortly be doing the layout for the pattern so that it can be made available for purchase.

I am also using this image as the cartoon for a woodcarving.
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:iconrealgoodpizza:
realgoodpizza Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2011
This is an amazing design!
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:iconkifudancer:
Kifudancer Featured By Owner May 4, 2008
This is such a wonderful design. What did you end up using it in? (I know you said you used it in wood working as well, but I mean this stitched piece)
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:icontalyrasmirror:
TalyrasMirror Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2008
You sent me a message about my Children of Lir pattern way back in May. Well, I'm finally free of my annual Ren Fair craziness, and I can answer you.

The pattern was stitched and shown as a framed piece at the annual Woodlawn needlework show. It won a blue ribbon for Best Adult Original Blackwork. I plan on selling the pattern in the retail market as soon as I get it printed. If you would like a copy, keep in touch. When I have patterns for sale, I will announce it in my journal.

Thanks!

Kathleen
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:iconladyblacksword:
LadyBlacksword Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2008   Digital Artist
I completely agree with Attackfish.
Most DA Artisan Crafts artists don't use anything but their own designs. Your carvings are almost odd in that many of them do use other's designs. If you take a look at my Artisan Crafts account, I almost never use a design that I haven't at the very least done a lot of interpretive work on, and then only for commissions.
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:icontalyrasmirror:
TalyrasMirror Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2008
Ah, but that depends on the medium. Tatting, sewing, crochet, knitting, cross stitch, macrame, quilting, and many other soft crafts are all Artisan Crafts. They are recognized as art forms, and they are more often done by the general populace using someone else's pattern. Similarly, stenciling, wheat weaving, marquetry, leather carving. There is a huge market for patterns and pattern books, and I am not the only one to use them.

I just know that even though I do use other's patterns, I am still an artisan in my own right.

Even your pieces use references to other work. I know that you drew the tre-foil on your hair pieces. But you saw it first somewhere else. Reference and historic precedence is part of art, and aways has been. There is nothing wrong with it.

DA is not the general populace. The artistic talent here is overwhelming, and the likelihood that a constructive artist, like a potter or a jewelry maker, will use his or her own patterns is higher than in other groups.

Kathleen
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:iconladyblacksword:
LadyBlacksword Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2008   Digital Artist
Hmm. I did state that I at the very least involve a great deal of interpretive work, and the triquetra (it's proper name as knotwork. I'm a bit of a scholar on this subject.) is a design that is easy to interpret. I can't even consider faulting someone on using a design as ancient as the triquetra.

However, to characterize all artisan crafts as commonly thought to be copies of others work is inaccurate, silly, and just a hair insulting.
There is a difference in the classification of "Crafts" and "Artisan Crafts". "Crafts" is what elementary school classes and kits produce. "Artisan Crafts" indicates that "art" was involved, ie: creation. inspiration. ideas. originality. Even using another's design with permission and rendering it into a new media counts in Artisan Crafts, provided a) the design was original, not mass produced. b) it's not just something like tracing it directly with no interpretation inherent in the execution of the new artwork.
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:icona-to-z:
a-to-z Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2007
what a beautiful design! where do you draw your inspirations from? this has tinges of greek art in it (the rounded wings combined with the repeating pattern)... or do you just go by what looks/feels right?
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:icontalyrasmirror:
TalyrasMirror Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2007
Thank you!

I do a number of themed shows (Celtic, Renaissance), and in college I did living history (specifically Vikings). This piece is my interpretation of the Celtic style, and it is based on a Celtic myth. And your right, there was some Greek influence in Celtic art. And then the Celts were conquored by the Romans, which actually helped spread their culture and artistic style.

Repeating patterns, interlace, and stylized interpretations of human, animal and plant forms are textbook Celtic.

Oh, and I like circles.

Kathleen
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:icona-to-z:
a-to-z Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2007
It's certainly a graceful interpretation of celtic art. I remember for a while I really liked Celtic style rings, and actually had one in sterling silver that someone had bought for me. It had a repeating zig-zag pattern all round and was very 'manly,' if you know what I mean.

Thanks for the mini history lesson; I don't know much about origins/styles of art. And it looks like you do. ;p

I like circles too.
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:iconladyblacksword:
LadyBlacksword Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2008   Digital Artist
FYI: The zigzags were most likely a form of "key" pattern, which is often greek, except for some very early celtic and viking examples.
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